How to dispute incorrect information in your credit report?

How to dispute incorrect information in your credit report?                                         Disputing incorrect information with the Credit Bureaus is the first step towards fixing errors in your credit report.  Credit reporting is governed primarily by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”). The FCRA requires that you dispute inaccurate information with the credit bureaus BEFORE you can sue BIG BAD BANK for destroying your credit score. It’s almost like the BIG BAD BANK gets a “Get out of Jail FREE Card,” in the 

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How To Get Your Free Credit Reports

How To Get Your Free Credit Reports 1. Fill-out the attached form and send it to the address indicated in the form:                            Annual Credit Report Request Service P.O. Box 105281 Atlanta, GA 30348-5281 2. Call 1-877-FACT-ACT (877-322-8228) and ask for the three (3) credit reports: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. 3. Do both: send the and also make the telephone call. 4. Do not get the reports on the Internet. 5. Do not get the reports through other companies, for example, your bank or a credit monitoring service. 

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Debt Collector Ignored Beverly’s Request To Stop Calling

Beginning on January 1, 2010, Ms. Beverly Shand-Pistilli received multiple calls at home by debt collector, Professional Account Services, Inc. The calls were as late as 8.58 PM. Beverly asked the debt collector to stop calling her at home but the debt collector ignored her requests and persisted to collect the debt. Judge O’Neill held in Shand-Pistilli v. Professional Account Services (July  26, 2010) that “A debt collector may not cause a telephone to ring or engage any person in telephone conversation repeatedly or continuously with the intent to annoy, abuse, or harass any person at the called number. Ms. Shand-Pistilli asked 

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Temple University Held to Violate the Fair Credit Reporting Act

Edward Seamans sued Temple University for violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”), 15 U.S.C. Section 1681s-2(b). Seamans received a Perkins student loan from Temple in 1989 and subsequently dropped out of Temple without making any payments on the Perkins student loan. In 2010, Seamans applied for financial aid from Drexel University, and Drexel told him it would not provide any financial aid until he paid the balance of his Perkins loan to Temple. On April 28, 2011, Seamans paid his Perkins loan in full to Temple. The loan was outstanding and unpaid for over twenty (20) years. Seamans act of 

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