Reversing a Tax Sale in Philadelphia

Reversing a Tax Sale in Philadelphia Philadelphia is one of the few places in Pennsylvania where a home owner can reverse a Tax Sale. Believe it or not, most tax sales are final in Pennsylvania once the gavel comes down. Thanks to the Municipal Claims and Tax Liens Act, a homeowner has a statutory right to redeem their sold property within 9 months from the date of the acknowledgment of the Sheriff’s Deed conveying the Property. Whose eligible to redeem their property after a Tax Sale? • Any home owner who resides in a property in Philadelphia is eligible; • Any 

Read More

Reversing a Tax Sale in Philadelphia

Reversing a Tax Sale in Philadelphia Philadelphia is one of the few places in Pennsylvania where a home owner can reverse a Tax Sale. Believe it or not, most tax sales are final in Pennsylvania once the gavel comes down. Thanks to the Municipal Claims and Tax Liens Act (Act), Act of May 16, 1923, P.L. 207, as amended, 53 P.S. § 7293, a homeowner has a statutory right to redeem their sold property within 9 months from the date of the acknowledgment of the Sheriff’s Deed conveying the Property. Redemption Petition pursuant to Section 32(a) of the Act, 53 

Read More

Your Legal Rights After a Pennsylvania Sheriff Sale

Shenanigans sometimes occur during a sheriff sale. Homeowners are occasionally shocked to find out that their family home was sold at a sheriff sale. The reasons for these Shenanigans varies from incompetent lawyering to outright criminality. Sometimes homeowners never receive any notice of the underlying foreclosure complaint but they always seem to receive notice of the action in ejectment, which is the legal method to obtain possession of the property after a sheriff’s sale. What Happens After a Sheriff Sale First the sheriff must file a schedule of distribution within 30 days after the sale. If no objections are filed 

Read More

Reversing a Sheriff Sale in Philadelphia

Pennsylvania homeowners have the right to “cure” a mortgage loan (i.e., pay off all arrears and reinstate the loan) up to one hour before the Sheriff Sale. (41 Pennsylvania Statutes Section 404). Pennsylvania Law first created a statutory right to cure a mortgage default in 1974 by establishing Act 6, also known as the Loan Interest and Protection Law. By “cure,” the statute means a restoration of the mortgage “to the same position as if the default had not occurred.” Act 6 established the right to cure defaults up until one hour before a sheriff sale. (41 P.S. Section 404). 

Read More